Katja Stokley

songs that speak to us: david norris

 Posted by on Friday, November 13, 2020  The Choir Diary
Nov 132020
 

Tenor David Norris says: We just recorded the song “Hope Lingers On” as part of a virtual choir. It was written by Lissa Schneckenburger and arranged for SATB by Andrea Ramsey. I think the lyric especially relates to the current situation in this country, although its real impact is when it appears with the music.

Hope Lingers On

Lissa Schneckenburger

My mother, when love is gone, in our darkest hour hope lingers on.
My father, when peace is gone, in our darkest hour hope lingers on.
I will not hate, and I will not fear. In our darkest hour, hope lingers on.
My sister, when equality’s gone in our darkest hour, hope lingers on.
My brother, with tolerance gone in our darkest hour hope lingers on.
I will not hate, and I will not fear. In our darkest hour, hope lingers on.
My love, when honor is gone, in our darkest hour hope lingers on.
My country, when justice is gone, in our darkest hour hope lingers on.
I will not hate, and I will not fear. In our darkest hour, hope lingers on.

Here it is performed by Allegro con Brio in Kansas City:

songs that speak to us: ellen ross

 Posted by on Wednesday, November 11, 2020  The Choir Diary
Nov 112020
 

From alto Ellen Ross: This is the song that’s making me happy these days! This is Samba de Mayo by El Eco with the vocal by Kim Nazarian of New York Voices. I heard it one day on KUVO and had to find out what it was. It’s a great song to listen to when I’m doing anything around the house. I can’t help but move, smile and vocalize along with Kim Nazarian. The uncertainty of the election makes it a perfect day for a joyful pick-me-up with Samba de Mayo. Enjoy!

sky loom

 Posted by on Tuesday, November 3, 2020  The Choir Diary
Nov 032020
 

In November 2016, we performed “Sky Loom” by Jean Belmont Ford at First Congregational Church of Boulder. In light of the devastating fires we’ve experienced in Colorado in 2020, it feels timely to revisit this piece which Belmont Ford composed from two North American Indian texts “intended to symbolize the intertwined threads that link a parent and child – or a people and the land.”

Cello played by Julie Emery. Part of the concert series titled Choral Heritage of the United States. Video editing by Cantabile member Hari Baumbach.

utopia

 Posted by on Monday, October 26, 2020  The Choir Diary
Oct 262020
 
Margaret R. Friesen;
Utopia

There.
It is over there;
Can’t you see it?
Far away and
There.

Here?
Crying and
Sleepless nights.

Here?
Things end,
There’s no room

There.
Is everything
Although not everything
I guess because
There’s no crying there
Or there shouldn’t be.

There’s everything that could be
but there…
There isn’t

There
is

There
is horizons

There is
a horizon

There
is over and
over again

There is
overflowing

There is
anxiety

There for
not knowing
and not being

There.

There
is not

There
might come to us
but

There
cannot be made
or felt fully here
or even

There.
even as we
see or know a

‘There’ is not
a ‘there’ nor a

Here is
the point and

There exists because of

Here which
pervades all

There is.

There is all.
There was all.
There will be
All.

It’s all There.
Everywhere there is
or was
or will be a
There where
Here and
There where all is
There and
Here where all isn’t
There.

It’s
All
There

‘Utopia’, a poem by Cantabile alto Maggie Friesen, was written as part of a CU senior thesis project about the complex ideas of utopia.

a note from our artistic director

 Posted by on Tuesday, September 22, 2020  The Choir Diary
Sep 222020
 

Brian StoneBeing separated from each other and without the ability to unite our voices has been difficult. If anything, this time has made it even more clear why making music is so important to all of us: we use music to connect with each other, learn about our history and our world, and to share messages of hope and beauty with our community. This is what we are continuing to do despite the challenges.

Cantabile is regularly meeting virtually, where we continue to hone our craft, build even stronger bonds, and create art to share with all of you. Over these next few months, we will be providing a glimpse into our regular process by posting pictures, poems, and short writings from myself and our singers on our blog, The Choir Diary.

I hope that you’ll check in with us and stay up to date on how we are making the most of our time physically distanced. When we are able to meet all together again, we will be so excited to share our live music with you again.

Brian Stone, Artistic Director